Electricity Policy

       

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Integrating Variable Resources in the Pacific Northwest

Integrating Variable Resources in the Pacific Northwest

By Jeremy Eckstein

With storage too costly at present, Pacific Northwest utilities needing operating flexibility are weighing the relative advantages of demand response programs and establishing or joining a regional energy imbalance market.
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n this paper I explore what sources of electricity system flexibility are likely to be adopted in Oregon and Washington in order to manage predicted increases in renewable energy.  Although it is Northwest-centric in its focus and industry review, I believe it has relevance to US markets in general, as renewables integration and the search for greater system flexibility is of wide and growing interest.  I also explore policy options to encourage adoption of these technologies.

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Will U.S. Utilities Experience an Energy Transition Similar to Germany’s?

Will U.S. Utilities Experience an Energy Transition Similar to Germany’s?

By Bob Gibson

Changes in the structure of the evolving electricity markets of the U.S. and Germany may make national differences in policy and public perception irrelevant, as new technologies take hold.

 

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hen E.ON, one of Europe’s largest utilities, announced in December that it would spin off its conventional power generation business into a separate entity and refocus on renewables, energy efficiency and grid operations, an obvious question arose: Could similar transitions be coming to utilities in the United States?  In a word, yes.

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Competitive Power Markets Benefit Customers, but Standards that Support Competition Must Be Preserved

Competitive Power Markets Benefit Customers, but Standards that Support Competition Must Be Preserved

By Bill Massey

It’s indisputable that competition is a highly effective way to ensure that electricity, an essential engine of our economy, is provided to users reliably and at lowest cost. But it’s also crucial that we preserve rules that assure fair and wholesome competition.
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t is hard to believe that almost two decades have passed since federal and state utility regulators began in earnest to adopt competitive markets as a preferred way to ensure a reliable supply of electricity at the lowest available cost.  What’s even harder to believe is that there are still skeptics who doubt that electricity markets – where they have been fully implemented – are indeed beneficial to consumers and the regional economies they power.  Members of the COMPETE Coalition are not to be found among the skeptics.

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Considerations for State Regulators and Policymakers in a Post-FERC Order 745 World

Considerations for State Regulators and Policymakers in a Post-FERC Order 745 World

By Peter Cappers and Andy Satchwell

State regulators and policymakers should act now, while demand response is under judicial review, to develop contingency plans to ensure resource adequacy is not jeopardized and that DR remains a robust and economic resource for meeting electricity needs.
 
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y vacating FERC Order 745 in Electric Power Supply Association vs. FERC (“EPSA”)  , the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C Circuit injected uncertainty into the future of demand response (DR) resources in U.S. wholesale markets.  Among several things, the decision explicitly identified “incentive-responsive demand” as a retail transaction, not a wholesale transaction.  Thus, demand response, as the industry has come to understand it within the confines of ISO/RTO-administered energy markets, is not under FERC jurisdiction but rather state jurisdiction.  However, if the Court of Appeals’ majority arguments are taken to their logical conclusion, then FERC may not have jurisdiction over DR providing any bulk-power system service, not just energy.

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The Shape of Things to Come: Net Demand

The Shape of Things to Come:  Net Demand

By Bentham Paulos

As wind and solar mature commercially they have novel effects on power system operations, planning, and finances.  With Germany and California in the vanguard, policy solutions are emerging. But to best pursue a clean energy future, we first must change the way we look at our power systems, starting with the daily load profile. 
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he growth of wind and solar power are introducing a new element into grid operations, and changing the way grid operators look at the system.  Indeed, they are changing the familiar daily shape of the demand profile.

 

If you would like to obtain a complimentary PDF file of Mr Paulos's article on Net Demand, and were unable to sign up for a 30-day free trial to Electricity Daily and ElectricityPolicy.com, please email your request to [email protected].

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Electricity Daily

Iowa House weighs restricting eminent domain for merchant transmission lines

Iowa House weighs restricting eminent domain for merchant transmission lines

March 27, 2015 -- Most Iowans don’t seem to like the idea of merchant transmission companies using the state’s eminent domain laws, so on Wednesday the GOP-controlled Iowa House committee has voted out House Study Bills 222 and 223, where it appears they may win approval. House Study Bill 222, approved on a 5-4 vote, is targeted at Clean Line Energy ‘s Rock Island Clean Line, which would extend 375 ...

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Tucson Electric seeks ‘equitable’ cut in net metering payments to customers

Tucson Electric seeks ‘equitable’ cut in net metering payments to customers

Tucson Electric Power has asked Arizona regulators for permission to reduce the net metering payments it makes to its rooftop solar customers for the excess electricity the customers’ solar systems provide the utility. Instead of paying customers with solar PV the utility’s retail price for electricity, TEP is proposing that the customers receive the same wholesale price that the utility pays to lar...

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Virginia wins federal lease, opening way to erect two 6-MW offshore wind turbines

Virginia wins federal lease, opening way to erect two 6-MW offshore wind turbines

The Old Dominion has secured a wind energy research lease to build and operate turbines in federal waters, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced Tuesday. The agreement with the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will enable Dominion Virginia Power to move forward with its plans to erect a pair of 6-MW test turbines on the Outer Continental Shelf, about 24 nautical miles e...

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In Kentucky, right meets left on energy efficiency financing and everyone wins

In Kentucky, right meets left on energy efficiency financing and everyone wins

Kentucky Republicans and Democrats came together to enact landmark energy efficiency financing legislation this week. The EPAD Act—EPAD stands for Energy Project Assessment Districts—sponsored by “rising star” James Kay, a Versailles Democrat, and signed by Gov. Steve Beshear, offers a proven way for commercial and industrial property owners to pay for energy efficiency upgrades at no cost to Kent...

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UK, Norway to build world’s longest undersea cable for UK to import hydro

UK, Norway to build world’s longest undersea cable for UK to import hydro

The UK and Norway agreed Thursday to build a €2 billion ($2.2 billion) power cable that will connect the countries’ electricity markets in 2021, enabling the UK to import Norwegian hydro power when the wind isn’t blowing, and potentially cutting electricity bills. Norway’s grid operator Statnett SF and the UK’s National Grid said they will share in the investment for the undersea cable, the world’...

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Sweeping ComEd bill in Illinois recasts reimagined role of distribution utility

Sweeping ComEd bill in Illinois recasts reimagined role of distribution utility

March 26, 2015 -- A comprehensive bill backed by Commonwealth Edison was introduced in the Illinois legislature last week that would redefine the utility’s mission in several fundamental ways. Significantly, and perhaps controversially, it would change the basis of ComEd’s billing for its residential customers, from a volumetric, energy-usage based bill to one that reflects a customer’s peak deman...

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Editorials

Unsolicited advice for EPA on Its Clean Power Plan: Encourage regional compliance

Unsolicited advice for EPA on Its Clean Power Plan: Encourage regional compliance

Two regional transmission organizations—PJM and MISO—were asked by their constituencies to assess whether compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon-cutting Clean Power Plan might be achieved more cost-effectively if planned on a region-wide rather than on a state-by-state basis.

Each RTO analyzed the problem preliminarily and each found that several billion dollars might be saved...

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Guest editorial: Demand response and electricity market reform: What next?

Guest editorial: Demand response and electricity market reform: What next?

Responding to the excellent paper by Peter Cappers and Andy Satchwell, “ Considerations for State Regulators and Policymakers in a Post-FERC Order 745 World ,” we want to share a conversation that transpired at a recent conference that addressed the issues of reliability in organized markets, the uncertain future for demand response, and what level of government—state or federal—should oversee it. T...

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The virtuous circle of infrastructure investment— a win, win, win proposition

The virtuous circle of infrastructure investment— a win, win, win proposition

In President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1955 State of the Union speech, he said, “A modern highway system is essential to meet the needs of our growing population, our expanding economy, and our national security.” Eisenhower led the movement to develop the interstate highway system that links the US, making vehicle travel for transportation, tourism, and the greater economy so accessible that we take...

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Three cheers for state regulators, in Connecticut and elsewhere

Three cheers for state regulators, in Connecticut and elsewhere

State utility regulators are a hard-working lot. They have a tough job and an underappreciated one.

State commission budgets and staff aren’t what they should be. Their resources are unequal to those of the companies they’re supposed to regulate.

The mind-numbing details buried in rate cases, and planning and mergers and other proceedings are not light reading.

Thus, ill-tempered remarks  from Connecti...

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Digging deeper: Competition at the distribution level

Digging deeper: Competition at the distribution level

The pro-competitive reforms introduced into the bulk electricity transmission grid by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission over the past two decades and more, culminating in FERC Order No. 1000, have transformed what was once a patchwork of transmission monopolies into something more resembling a common carrier system.

Today, as innovation has crept into the local level, with both supply- and d...

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Why should we be concerned with India?

Why should we be concerned with India?

Yesterday we published three articles that concerned India. You may ask why (aside from the dearth of interesting US news). There are several reasons.

  • One story announced US-based SunEdison’s plans to build a $4 billion solar manufacturing factory with an Indian company.
  • A second concerned plans of Rajasthan, one of the largest of India’s 29 states, and the sunniest, to develop 655 MW of solar as th...

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